Sometimes technology makes me sad

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I'm talking about you ereaders. I get the benefits, for example, of traveling with a Kindle rather than 5 books. I see why the University I went to just switched over to ebooks which allows students to pick chapters they need and have them emailed to them in pdf files. But at the end of the day the ereaders will be replaced every few years, like cell phones, causing more environmental damage and it's just never going to be a book. It sounds silly but there is something so comforting to me about books. Sitting in the corner of a tiny bookshop, standing beside huge stacks of books, curling into bed with a great book with pages that I can feel as I turn them, is up there with cracking the top of a creme brulee and listening to the waves crash on the beach and no ereader will ever replace that for me. Then again I'm that girl who moved back from New York with only one suitcase, but shipped back 5 boxes of books I'd managed to acquire.


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dinkycow wrote:
curling into bed with a great book with pages that I can feel as I turn them, is up there with cracking the top of a creme brulee and listening to the waves crash on the beach and no ereader will ever replace that for me.


See, here's the thing for me. I don't read great books. I mean, I do, but I read like most people watch movies. And I read trash fiction, the same way most people watched...Batman and Robin and anything that has Will Ferrell in it. Like, horrible, pulpy, repetitive trash...lots of detective fiction, spy stories, hell - goddamn paranormal romances(this is my current kick). And I'm a speed reader, so I get through them quite fast(it takes me about 3-4 hours to get through a standard Dan Brown-ish paperback).

Needless to say, I actually don't WANT any of these books on my bookshelf, or to even be seen visibly reading them most of the time, so my Kindle has been aweeeeesome.

I have a growing pop-up book collection, though, and I'm happy that ereaders can't replace THOSE.


I don't like E-readers either. If it has benefits for the environment that's awesome ofcourse. But I prefer reading a book, actually turning the page. And I just don't like reading things of my laptop screen. A book reads way more pleasant in my opinion.


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Now that I've had an ereader for over a year, I realize how much I love it though I was skeptical at first. I still buy print books, as many as I've always bought, but I actually buy MORE books than I used to because of the ereader. I'm willing to spend the money on an ebook for an author I've never read or a book that I "kind of want to read but I'm not really sure". If I love the book I go buy the copy to put on my shelf. (For the record, we have 8ft tall by 14ft long bookshelves that between my husband and myself are almost full.)

I also buy a lot more magazines than I used to. One thing I always hated was a stack of magazines lying around, taking up space that I was keeping for a few choice articles or recipes. I equally hated pulling out the pages I wanted and keeping them in binders, etc. The ereader has allowed me to buy more magazines and not feel a twinge of guilt or irritation over it.

Like cell phones and computers, ereaders can be recycled and that's what will happen to mine when/if I have to replace it. Having one has allowed me to support the book industry in a way I didn't before and I think that is a good thing.

I also have the pet peeve of people saying that ebooks are not "real" books. They are "real" books because the book is the content, not the format that it is put in. Ebooks are just as valid as print books. I love my print books and I hope the form never goes away, but if I read a book on my ereader or I hold the paper version in my hand I am still getting the same information.

I can understand peoples feelings both ways. It took having my own ereader to change my mind about them.


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I need the smell and feel of ink on paper.

I can't imagine curling up with a soft blanket, a cup of tea, and...a plastic gadget.


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I love my Nook... I am someone who hates carrying bags etc, so it's awesome to have this tiny thing that fits into my pocket and lets me read new/old/short/long books without having to lug around a huge chunk of tree (I used to mostly buy hardbacks, or read library books).

I love being able to read the first chapter of pretty much any book I want & I love being able to prop up my reader; then not have it lose my page at the beginning or the end of a book when I drop it/shuffle it under my arm to get on or off the bus.

I love being able to flick between fiction, non-fiction, serious, deep, superficial, etc etc when away for a few days.

I love hearing about a book on the radio, online, or through a conversation and be reading the first chapter as soon as I am on the bus, sofa etc.. While the memory of whatever drew me to is is still fresh.

I love Nook 'Free Fridays' where one book of their choice is free each and every Friday. It's a great opportunity to read something that I have no preconceptions about, that falls outside my usual genre or known authors. It's better than the library; because even then you browse and choose (Seattle library does have a great ebook selection, though.)

I also had to prune & box up my rather extensive book collection, when I moved (along with my DVD, cassettes, LPs) this made me not want to physically 'own' as much of the media which I read/watch/listen to in the future.

(However, while at an airport yesterday I did feel a slight pang of remorse, while browsing the book isle, that I no longer buy these beautiful objects... And seeing a closed down used/rare book shop in San Diego made me sad that future generations won't have the joy of smelling and leafing through shaky shelves of literature (in anything but a 'retro' experience.))

Well we've been a good few hours drinking
So I'm going to say what everyone's thinking
If we're stuck on this ship and it's sinking
Then we might as well have a parade

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Amanda_Louise wrote:
I need the smell and feel of ink on paper.

I can't imagine curling up with a soft blanket, a cup of tea, and...a plastic gadget.


Oddly enough, it was exactly this situation that helped me change my mind - when I realized I could hold the e reader in only one hand(I can't hold a book and turn pages at the same time...small hands), therefore allowing my other hand to be attached to the tea mug at the same time!

Major downside of an e-reader and the onehanded hold is that I constantly smack myself in the face with it when reading lying down.


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dinkycow wrote:
...But at the end of the day the ereaders will be replaced every few years, like cell phones, causing more environmental damage...


:-( I do fear you are quite right here, I must admit that I recently replaced my first (only 2 years old) reader with the newer sexier model...

(The older one is still in use, Sunny hated the idea of eReaders, but I did the typical husbandly thing of justifying my technology purchase by loading up the perfectly good replaced thing with stuff my better half would like... And yesterday she actually commented on the benefit of being able to hold/carry/read the 1000 page Alexander Hamilton biography and how the library book would have just been left at home rather than be available to read while lying next to a pool or on the plane..)

Well we've been a good few hours drinking
So I'm going to say what everyone's thinking
If we're stuck on this ship and it's sinking
Then we might as well have a parade

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Probably my favorite thing in the world was to curl up with a good book and a cup of tea. I would average 3-4 hours a night. I read almost every night for over 20 years. I was always running out of room books and had to donate books to our local Salvation Army (great write off on taxes)

Since my accident 3 years ago my eyes can't focus enough to read. I use my iPhone and the like with one eye closed. I held out using audio books in the hope that we would find a way to fix my eye. I finally broke down and starting using Audible. Now I go through 5 or 6 books a month. It sucks to have to pay significantly more for books, but I listen for 3-4 hours a night. It's actually nice not having to worry about pronouncing names or places. It also give me a chance to listen to books I wouldn't otherwise read. I read Atlas Shrugged in college and it was a pain because of the tiny text most versions use. I listened to it and loved it.

Ron

Toy Collection and other crap on Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/thotfulspot/

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theboywil wrote:
dinkycow wrote:
...But at the end of the day the ereaders will be replaced every few years, like cell phones, causing more environmental damage...


:-( I do fear you are quite right here, I must admit that I recently replaced my first (only 2 years old) reader with the newer sexier model...

(The older one is still in use, Sunny hated the idea of eReaders, but I did the typical husbandly thing of justifying my technology purchase by loading up the perfectly good replaced thing with stuff my better half would like... And yesterday she actually commented on the benefit of being able to hold/carry/read the 1000 page Alexander Hamilton biography and how the library book would have just been left at home rather than be available to read while lying next to a pool or on the plane..)


I might be wrong here, but I always thought an eReader was more environmentally friendly, since everything was digital and didn't require chopping down tree's to make paper. I could be totally ignorant on it though. :)


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Zero Mistro wrote:
theboywil wrote:
dinkycow wrote:
...But at the end of the day the ereaders will be replaced every few years, like cell phones, causing more environmental damage...


:-( I do fear you are quite right here, I must admit that I recently replaced my first (only 2 years old) reader with the newer sexier model...

(The older one is still in use, Sunny hated the idea of eReaders, but I did the typical husbandly thing of justifying my technology purchase by loading up the perfectly good replaced thing with stuff my better half would like... And yesterday she actually commented on the benefit of being able to hold/carry/read the 1000 page Alexander Hamilton biography and how the library book would have just been left at home rather than be available to read while lying next to a pool or on the plane..)


I might be wrong here, but I always thought an eReader was more environmentally friendly, since everything was digital and didn't require chopping down tree's to make paper. I could be totally ignorant on it though. :)


You can also recycle them just like any other technology - cell phones, laptops, etc. We have a place here locally that specializes in electronic recycling. Doesn't cost any more than going to drop it off.

Amanda_Louise wrote:
I need the smell and feel of ink on paper.

I can't imagine curling up with a soft blanket, a cup of tea, and...a plastic gadget.


I thought that at first too, but then I realized eating and drinking while I read is so much easier with my Nook. I don't lose my place. I don't fumble with my food or drink and spill.

I've also come to realize how much easier it is to use my Nook to read while I'm in the bathtub. It's easier to hold and flip pages without worrying about dropping.


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Thotfulspot wrote:
It sucks to have to pay significantly more for books, but I listen for 3-4 hours a night.


I am sure you already know, but, just in case... You can get a load of downloadable audio books from the library through Overdrive. (Chicago does offer them, if you happen to be in their district, and I assume that they are as free as they are in Seattle)

When I had a long cycle commute I was plouging through them, you can listen to them on pretty much any audio device which supports audible. On iphones (and maybe other smartphones) you can download a selection of them directly to your device.

Well we've been a good few hours drinking
So I'm going to say what everyone's thinking
If we're stuck on this ship and it's sinking
Then we might as well have a parade

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merrybee wrote:
I've also come to realize how much easier it is to use my Nook to read while I'm in the bathtub. It's easier to hold and flip pages without worrying about dropping.


And if you do drop it then putting it in a ziploc with a load of uncooked rice for a couple of days brings it back to life with minimal fuss (...hmmm wonder how I found that out... ;) )

Well we've been a good few hours drinking
So I'm going to say what everyone's thinking
If we're stuck on this ship and it's sinking
Then we might as well have a parade

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theboywil wrote:
merrybee wrote:
I've also come to realize how much easier it is to use my Nook to read while I'm in the bathtub. It's easier to hold and flip pages without worrying about dropping.


And if you do drop it then putting it in a ziploc with a load of uncooked rice for a couple of days brings it back to life with minimal fuss (...hmmm wonder how I found that out... ;) )


:lol: Thanks for the tip! Hopefully I'll never need it. Mine's out of warranty now.


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I'm always skeptical about electronic recycling. I've seen lots of reports and documentaries where for example they followed a huge barge of recyclable electronics picked up from Best Buy and it ended up polluting India and leaking awful chemicals into the ground where children walked barefoot.

I donate all my old books to the public libraries and keep all the good ones.

Being that I smack myself in the face with my iphone & remote I can count on smacking myself with an ereader too.

All the points you guys are making about all the readers I totally understand and it's a great selling point, it just feels like I'm cheating on my love affair with books. And Merrybee is correct it's the content of the book not the physical object technically but for me there is something about a physical book that is comforting. I still have the copy of Matilda that was read to me as a girl and I've read it countless times since. That book sitting on my shelf just can't compare with a copy being stored on a device.



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